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1. What is Fatigue Profile?

Power Profile is telling us more about your abilities in cycling, but it is not telling us the whole story about the athlete. Fatigue profile can tell you more about resistance to the fatigue in specific periods of time. For example, if you are a good sprinter and your 5 sec. power is very high it gives you the ability to win short finishes from the group, but what is your power after 10 sec. and 20 sec. maybe your race tactic should be different and you should start finishing at 500 meters to finish line rather than 150 meters. The same rule is applied to other zones like anaerobic or VO2 max. Bellow you can find testing protocols for specific zones and guidelines to define what is your fatigue resistance.

2. Fatigue Profile Protocols

Fatigue Profile zone 6

 

It’s very important to find the right gear for you to start doing any of those intervals. Then more intervals you do than better you will “feel” your gears. For small ring, gears use 39:16, and don’t shift during intervals.

Time/DistanceDescription% of FTP% of FTHR
Warm-up~ 20 min.Easy riding65< 70
Main set3 x 50-75 m (2-3 min. Rl)Small-ring sprints from 8-10 mph max N/A
150 m (5 min. Rl)Big-ring sprints (52:17, 50:16) from 18 mph max N/A
250 m (5 min. Rl)Big-ring sprints (52:15, 50:14) from 18 mphmaxN/A
300 – 350 m (5 min. Rl).Big-ring sprints (52:13, 50:13) from 24 mphmaxN/A
Cool down15 min.Easy riding 60-70 < 68

Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. (2010) Training and racing with a power meter. Boulder, CO.

Fatigue Profile zone 5c

 

It is very important to don’t “blow off” yourself at the beginning of an interval, don’t start too hard. Keep the focus on trying to keep the highest possible average power for the entire duration of the interval.

Time/DistanceDescription% of FTP% of FTHR
Warm-up~ 20 min.Easy riding65< 70
Main set30 sec. (4 min. Rl)All-out effort > 200 N/A
1 min. (5 min. Rl)All-out effort> 150 N/A
2 min. (5 min. Rl)All-out effort> 140N/A
Cool down30 min.Easy riding60-70< 68

Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. (2010) Training and racing with a power meter. Boulder, CO.

Fatigue Profile zone 5b

 

Remember to take more recovery between intervals if it is needed and do your best during intervals!

Time/DistanceDescription% of FTP% of FTHR
Warm-up~ 20 min.Easy riding< 75< 80
Main set3 min. (5 min. Rl)All-out effortavg. > 118> 106
5 min. (5 min. Rl)All-out effortavg. > 113> 106
8 min.All-out effortavg. > 108> 106
Cool down30 min.Easy riding60-70 < 68

Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. (2010) Training and racing with a power meter. Boulder, CO.

3. Fatigue Resistance

 

Find the guidelines below to check your fatigue resistance at specific zones, which will help you to work on your weaknesses and race with your strengths.

Zone 6 – Neuromuscular Power
Fatigue Resistance5 sec.10 sec.20 sec.
Well below average100%41% – 55%61% – 75%
Below average100%31% – 40%47% – 60%
Average100%23% – 30%36% – 46%
Above average100%15% – 21%20% – 34%
Well above average100%5% – 14%8% – 19%
Zone 5c – Anaerobic Capacity
Fatigue Resistance30 sec.1 min.2 min.
Well below average100%31% – 45%50% – 70%
Below average100%25% – 30%36% – 50%
Average100%21% – 24%23% – 35%
Above average100%10% – 20%15% – 22%
Well above average100%5% – 9%8% – 14%
Zone 5b – VO2 Max
Fatigue Resistance3 min.5 min.8 min.
Below average100%15% – 20%24% – 30%
Average100%8% – 14%18% – 23%
Above average100%4% – 7%10% – 17%

Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. (2010) Training and racing with a power meter. Boulder, CO.

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